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20121206
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
you see israel at this moment after gaza, after the palestinian vote at the united nations? >> well, i think that the gaza operation was necessary. they -- the operation started with the killing of one of the murderers and terrorists. there was responsible for the almost endless attacks against israelis, innocent citizens inside of t state of israel. >> rose: but at the same time, hadn't he been doing some negotiations and dealings in terms of trying to promote certain ideas? >> after he's there, there were all kinds of rumors about it, but during the times i was prime minister there were always kinds of ideas that were raised by third parties that we may negotiate indirectly with him but he was dedicated to one thing, to the destruction of the state of israel and therefore this outcome was inevitable. >> rose: but speaking of that, is it now understood that there will not be targeted assassinations in gaza? >> well, israel always said if there there will not be an attempt to launch rockets against israeli civilians then there will not be such activities then israel will not have a rea
the united nations vote whether to recognize the palestinian state. recognizing a palestinian state but the united states, israel and others are not celebrating. we will get the details ahead. the senate is working to change the law. the law that lets cops and the feds read our e-mails. they can just read them if the messages are more than six months old. a change coming that could affect all privacy. i am still on air today because my staff didn't win the record $588 million powerball jackpot. the deal was, if they won, obviously they were thought coming to work and the stage manager was going to anchor and i was going to hang out on their boat. but, no, there are two winners, obviously we hate them. we will talk about them unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, the united nations general assembly hold a historic vote any moment on recognizing an independent palestinian state. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly despite opposition from the united states and israel which are in a vast majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure
nations would be able to tell people in the united states how to deal with his daughter isabella and some republicans were citing that as a reason for rejecting the treaty. what do you say in. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife and their daughter and family, he's a strong family man. he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero -- i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. there is no ability to go to court. there is not one requirement of a change in american law. and there is no way to tell an american parent anything. now, that is according to our supreme court of the united states. that's according to the language in the treaty itself. and this is a treaty that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornbur
, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic action and then in her words, go down in flames. >> so, why religious leaders, especially these two, speakin
of the united nations that president assad probably should not expect any mercy from his counterparts around the world. jonathan hunt has more on that from the united nations here in new york. jonathan, quite a debate about the asylum question for assad. and the question is the question is whether president bashar assad has taken the final decision to as he once said live and die in syria. if he does die, it's most likely to be, of course, at the hands of the rebels when they make their final push into the center of damascus, a push which most experts believe is coming. all whether president assad might now be willing to or trying to seek asylum in some friendly country. that would probably boil down to cuba, ecuador venezuela or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be
wounded in two days of violence. jonathan hunt is live today at the united nations. the big question is, will president assad stay and fight? will he seek asylum? >>jonathan: the turks and russians, they are saying they are working on what they call "new ideas to bring an end to the ongoing 20--month-old civil war." they have nut given any ideas or details what those ideas might be but it will revolve around whether president assad has decided he going to live and die in syria and die most likely at the hands of the rebels or whether he can be persuaded to say asylum but that has the u.n. secretary-general having misgivings giving a man who has murdered 40,000 of his own people to give him retirement in a safe and friendly country. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity after gross violation of human rights. he must be held accountable and brought to justice>>jonathan: tf the argument is that any kind of solution that would persuade assad to stand down and end the slaughter of all of those syrian civilians might, actually, be worth considering. >>trace: what do we know of the
to the united nations, susan rice comes under fire again. this time, it's over rwanda. let's go "outfront. >>> good evening, welcome, everyone. "outfront" tonight breaking news, president obama puts the syrian president on notice. the president is reacting to new evidence that assad's regime has started mixing chemicals to make deadly sarin gas, adding to its massive stockpile of chemical weapons. >> and today i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> assad is on the edge of president obama's so-called red line against syria. the president said this summer that syria's use or movement of chemical weapons could mean u.s. intervention. so outfront tonight, barbara star. how exactly -- how clear is the evidence that they are moving in a new step with chemical weapons. >> it was just over the weekend in the last few days the intelligence began coming in.
at the united nations first to james rosen at the state department and to james nato is taking steps to minimize the amount landing outside of syria. >> that's right, shep. the foreign ministers of the military alliance gathered in brussels today and announced there that they have approved a request made by member state turkey which asked for u.s.-made patriot antimissile batteries to be installed along its southern border syria. the ministry made clear the systems are purely defensive. germany and netherlands are supplying the pac three model as soon as their respective parliaments approve the deal which is expected to come soon. >> when that exactly will happen will depend on a number of practical issues that will be sorted out in the very near future. so i can't give you an exact date but i will tell you that the actual deployment of missiles will take place within weeks. >> hundreds of nato troops will also be deployed to install and operate these antimissile weapons but it doesn't appear right now that they will be u.s. troops, shep. >> shepard: sheriffs clinton was at that meeting in bruss
at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then why -- why religious leaders, especially these two speaking out against her, drug and alcohol abuse is up.
u.s. ambassador to the united nation, john bolten, judith mill eric and ed qlien. we begin with the closed door briefs on benghazi that lawmakers say raises more questions than ever that the obama administration insisted the attack was the response of a demonstration prompted by rage over an anti-islam video. fox news correspondent with the latest on what lawmakers saw and heard today from the country's top intelligence officials. >> the closed classified briefing brought together seen your state department, intelligence, and counterterrorism officials for a report on the three-month old investigation into the benghazi terrorist attacks. >> to the degree there was planning involved, something done over days, weeks, or over hours? no indication of long term planning here. >> the attacks cronology was laid oillet in a multimedia presentation with drone surveillance and video from the consulate of the cia and annex. >> this is supposed to be sovereign u.s. territory, and if people walk in on us like that without resistance really makes your blood boil because you think to your
united nations to take control of the internet? jon: just in. new information out of egypt. reuters is reporting that egyptian president mohammed morsi has left the presidential palace after protesters fight with riot police outside the palace. of course he has been under intense pressure from his own people ever since he assumed autocratic powers and he has been engaged in a fight with the court system there. people have been very angry about what he has done. at any rate according to reuters he has left the presidential palace because of this, well, call them, demonstration, call them a mob. i'm not sure how you want to describe it but those are pictures outside the presidential palace in cairo. night has fallen there. we'll keep an eye on the situation. we have our steve harrigan there. we'll let you know as soon as we learn more. jenna: disturbing new signs al qaeda is on the rebound in parts of the middle east and after frica. the latest a large-scale al qaeda plot in jordan. they plan to hit deadly terror attacks in the capital and hit the u.s. embassy during the chaos. behind
and doctors are urging people to get flu shots. >>> the palestinian envoy to the united nations is condemning israel for plans for new settlements. and the united states says the construction would be damaging to prospect of renewed peace talks. >>> in atlanta, 43 students and 10 adults at an elementary school were taken to hospitals because of potentially deadly carbon monoxide levels near a furnace. the school wasn't required by threw have carbon monoxide dedetectiveors. in fact, only two states require them. >>> and lawyers released this high resolution color photographer taken the night he shot trayvon martin. the image shows blood dripping down zimmerman's face. >>> a rare public ceremony honored those who served in covert u.s. forces in afghanistan. marine sergeant william sutra jr. was awarded the navy cross and three others received silver stars. >>> and the voyager one spacecraft is about to be the first man made object to leave our solar system. it is sailing toward interstellar space. >>> here's your first look at this morning's dish of "scrambled politics." michael bloomberg had a
that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ >> bret: secretary general of the united nations is the latest world leader to warn syria against using chemical weapons. there are indications tonight syria's embattled president may be working on an exit strategy. correspondent connor powell is watching from jerusalem. >> in the heart of damascus, syrian forces fire rockets on nearby rebel additions. the fighting moving closer to the assad regime headquarters. this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton today reiterated her warnings to syrian president bashar assad against using chemical weapons. once again, saying it would cross a red line. senior syrian official refused to confirm the existence of the weapons but denied the government is considering using them in the fight, despite intelligence reports to the contrary. >> our concerns are that increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons. or might lose criminal of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> groups according to the u.s. intelligence reports that are affiliated with al-qaeda. and are inc
as the united states is concerned. the president over at the national defense university was celebrating today. he was celebrating what was create a program to eliminate nuclear weapons that were a leftover after the collapse of the soviet union. the u.s. provides lots of money and experts to help with the job. the program's responsible for deactivating more than 7,000 nuclear warheads over the past two decades, in addition, some 900 intercontinental ballistic missiles and 6.5 million pounds of chemical weapons material have been destroyed thanks to the program. >>> hillary clinton has served president obama for four years as secretary of state. four years from now, could she be moving into her boss' office over at the white house? after this weekend, a lot more people are beginning to speculate about what hillary clinton is planning to do. our "strategy session," james carville and mary matlin, are both standing by live. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit m
. >> senator, do you think that this might have passed if the words united nations were not attached to it? talk to me about this fear of the u.n. angered the u.n., some appropriate, some not, the black helicopter deal? >> there's a lot of fear that the u.n. is somehow going to encroach on united states sovereignty and prerogatives. one of the things i thought was most sad about yesterday, was here's a veteran of world war ii, grievously wounded in the war, who spent a lifetime proving to americans that injuries didn't need to stop you from living a completely fulfilled and productive life, who had to fight like crazy to come back from those wounds, and he's on the floor, this man who defended american sovereignty, and yet people were there suggesting somehow he was there less than to defend america's sovereignty with this vote. to me that was such an amazing slap in the face and a contradiction. i think it's important not to go backwards. one of the lessons you learn here in the united states senate you live to vote another day. this treaty is not dead forever. it just stopped yesterday.
there now so dangerous, the united nations announced today it is immediately pulling all nonessential employees out of syria. arwa damon, one of the few western journalists inside syria right now. you have been to aleppo, where the assad regime has a chemical weapons plant. let's get perspective from the ground and start with the regime. what is it saying about this new u.s. intelligence and now new warnings from the united states all the way up to president obama about a red line on the use of chemical weapons? >> reporter: well, the regime has historically denied that it would use any sort of chemical weapons against its own population, but that is something of an empty promise, at least from the perspective of everyone we have been speaking to about this. many of those fighters that we talked on the ground do say they do believe the greater the strangle hold they have on regime forces in the city of aleppo grows, the greater the likelihood is that in a desperate attempt to somehow either regain control or wreak mass havoc on the population, the regime would not hesitate when it com
't believe the u.n. should sign on as party to any united nations convention and because a two-thirds super majority is rard to ratify a treaty, that opposition means it will be close and they may lose. yesterday kerry told reporters he is about four votes short but thinks a handful of senators might still be willing to sign on. in an effort to win those 11th hour votes, former senator bob dole who was there when the ada, americans for disability act, was negotiated and signed in the early '90s, is expected to be present on the senate floor or at least right next to the floor when the vote actually takes place. of course dole was just optized at walter reed army medical center last week. his public appearances are very, very rare these days. he'll be honored late they are morning and then he'll be sitting there watching as some senators potentially walk by him to make that decision to vote against a treaty that he has been campaigning very hard for. the tough time this treaty is having is the latest sign of the growing isolationist party. yesterday the president used a speech celebrating th
-and-trade? reporter: sure, that is right. while liberal groups and others are looking for what the united nations is doing, what we used to call a kyoto at all, that process when he couldn't get a process through, he knows darn well he's not going to get through now. pushing out carbon heavy fuels like coal out of the u.s. energy mix. you mentioned west virginia. folks like democrats from those states are not happy about that. megyn: the nrdc says its approach will cost $4 billion a year. but they claim it will save over $25 billion each year in reduced pollution related illnesses like asthma. so we will wait and see if there's any action. thank you so much. dramatic new amateur video on the streets of serious capital. rebel forces battling government troops in damascus today. you can see rebel snipers shooting from inside buildings. secretary of state hillary clinton now raising more concerns that bashar al-assad may resort to using chemical weapons against his own people. hillary clinton saying the u.s. is worried about an increasingly desperate bashar al-assad may use the weapons or lose contr
. the commander says all the unmanned surveillance aircraft in the region are accounted for. other nations in the gulf including the united arab emirates have drones in service. >>> 5:15. muni issues are fixed. >> reporter: power was restored about 15 minutes ago before the morning commute heated up this morning so things are back on track. no delays for any muni lines right now so you be good to go for mass transit altogether. in fact, bart, ace, caltrain and ferries on time as well as muni. now, elsewhere we have a couple of things to look out for later on today. we have some roadwork scheduled for the lower deck of the bay bridge. that gets under way around 7:45 this morning. it will extend until 1:00 this afternoon. one lane will be shut down on the lower deck. there might be delays. bay bridge right now no troubles to report. westbound 4 good through antioch. we had early-morning construction that wrapped up about an hour earlier, as well. we are still seeing some slight delays there but lanes have reopened. at one point it was a full freeway closure on the eastbound side. looks like
is hurting our community and the economy of the united states. but we also feel that outsourcing is hurting our economy. >> reporter: that's not the case at all according to the harbor employees association. they say the strike impact is winding and it's costing the national economy billions of dollars. once again, a lot of estimates here say we are talking about $1 billion a day being lost. we are talking about truckers and people not going to work each day as this continues. we are told almost everything has been agreed upon but the one pain issue which is the issue about whether jobs should be kept here when someone retires or whether they can be added someplace else. megyn: growing international concerns over a report that syria is readying deadly and widely banned chemical weapons for combat use. we'll talk about what those chemicals are, what they can do and why america and the world is so worried about this. we are getting a look at george zimmerman's bloody face the night he shot and killed trayvon martin. why didn't the defense get this picture earlier? a new report suggests presid
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)